Letters from Ernest J. Gaines to Gus Blaisdell, editor New Mexico Quarterly-

Follow the link below to a Library Exhibit at Roger Williams University

Read letters to, from, and about Ernest J. Gaines, including several to Gus Blaisdell, editor of the New Mexico Quarterly.

https://libraryexhibits.rwu.edu/birss/2021/?page_id=27

2021 United States Inaugural Poem “The Hill We Climb” by Amanda Gorman

Dr. Biden, Madam Vice President, Mr. Emhoff, Americans, and the world.

When day comes, we ask ourselves, where can we find light in this never ending shade?
The loss we carry, a sea. We must wade.
We’ve graved the belly of the beast.
We’ve learned that quiet isn’t always peace.
In the norms and notions of what just is, isn’t always justice.
And yet the dawn is ours before we knew it. Somehow we do it.
Somehow we’ve weathered and witnessed a nation that it isn’t broken, but simply unfinished.
We, the successors of a country and the time where a skinny Black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president only to find herself reciting for one.
And yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine, but that doesn’t mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect.
We are striving to forge our union with purpose.

To compose a country, committed to all cultures, colors, characters, and conditions of man.
And so we lift our gaze, not to what stands between us, but what stands before us
We close the divide because we know to put our future first, we must first put our differences aside.
We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another. We seek harm to none and harmony for all.
Let the globe, if nothing else say, this is true.
That even as we grieved, we grew.
That even as we hurt, we hoped.
That even as we tired, we tried that will forever be tied together victorious.
Not because we will never again know defeat, but because we will never again sow division.
Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree and no one shall make them afraid
If we’re to live up to our own time, then victory won’t lie in the blade, but in all the bridges we’ve made.
That is the promise to glade the hill we climb.
If only we dare it’s because being American is more than a pride we inherit.
It’s the past we step into and how we repair it.

We’ve seen a force that would shatter or nation, rather than share it.
Would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy.
And this effort very nearly succeeded, but while democracy can be periodically delayed, it can never be permanently defeated in this truth.
In this faith we trust for while we have our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us. This is the era of just redemption.
We feared it in its susception.
We did not feel prepared to be the heirs of of such a terrifying hour, but within it, we found the power to author a new chapter.
To offer hope and laughter to ourselves.

So while once we asked, how could we possibly prevail over catastrophe?
Now we assert how could catastrophe possibly prevail over us?
We will not march back to what was, but move to what shall be a country that is bruised.
But whole benevolence, but bold, fierce, and free.

We will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation because we know our inaction and an Ursa will be the inheritance of the next generation.
Our blenders become their burdens, but one thing is certain.
If we merged mercy with the mights into might with right, a night then love becomes our legacy, and change our children’s birthright.
So let us leave behind a country better than one.

We were left with every breath, my bronze pounded chest.
We will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one.
We will rise from the gold limbed hills of the West.
We will rise from the wind swept to Northeast where our forefathers first realized the revolution.
We will rise from the lake when cities of the middle Western States.
We will arise from the sun baked South.
We will rebuild, reconciled and recover and every known nook over a nation.

And every corner called our country.
Our people diverse and beautiful will emerge, battered and beautiful.
When day comes, we step out of the shade of flame and unafraid, the new dawn balloons, as we free it.
For there was always light.
If only we’re brave enough to see it.
If only we’re brave enough to be it.

Amanda Gorman

Dreaming Peace is not enough

Untitled Cast Glass 2007 by Nicholas Africano
From Supermajority—
What we can do right now:
Donate to local groups:Minnesota Freedom Fund
Black Visions Collective
Reclaim the Block
What we can take with us:
Watch Alicia Garza speak with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi about his book, How To Be An Antiracist
Order at least one book from this list (and when you do, support a black-owned independent bookstore! One of our staff members recommends Harriett’s Bookshop or Semicolon Bookstore)
Read about the historical and racial context of Amy Cooper’s encounter with Christian Cooper, a Black man, in New York
More anti-racism resources for white people
With love,
Alicia, Ai-jen, Cecile, and the Supermajority staff

Gus Blaisdell 1935-2003

Joel Peter Witkin’s GUS




AFTER THE SYMBOLS
Chuang Tzu beats a bowl
And mourns.
His eyes are bright;
His wife, dead.
He sleeps, a skull
His pilllow dreaming life.
Morning finds
Incarnate knowledge:
The motions of fish
Against swift currents.

Gus Blaisdell


February 20, 2005

From Stanley Cavell

                                                             GUS     

On the evening of February 24, 2005

I will not be where Cathleen and I want to be, in Albuquerque with others of Gus’s friends gathered with his family, but instead I am to  give a talk that evening some five thousand miles from there, at the Cinematheque in Lisbon, as I agreed some months ago to do, introducing a series of a dozen films they have scheduled  there beginning with It Happened One Night and The Lady Eve and The Philadelphia Story.  These are three of countless films Gus and I spent time on together and I thank him for that in a book I wrote about such films.  I thank him in other books for other conversations.  But I profited from those conversations beyond any thanks I know how to give.  And I know that others trying to get on with writing books or making other things have the same causes for gratitude I have and feel the same way I do.  What I do not know is of anyone else whose range of friends, and whose care of his friends, was as great as Gus’s.  He knew people, and kept up with people, from all the lives he had led, or was living, seeming to have room in his memory for writings and images made by everyone, famous and not, that he had ever come across who showed a talent for doing something or saying something or playing something distinctive, and Gus had the rare knack and the tact of forming words of encouragement for them.  There kept being new names, some strange to me, some known to many, entering his conversation, or into one of his delirious monologues from a theater of his own.  He finished some memorable projects, and I believe others also must have tried and cried to get him to finish more, small and large.  It is frightening to think how many unfinished projects there must be heavy evidence of, ones he was right never to give up on.  This means that numbers of people who would have cared to know may not know what we know.  But we know it.  And I join in celebrating it.